1. The New York Times 2012: The Year in Graphics.Amazing examples of interactive storytelling and journalism, designed and developed byt the NYT Graphics team.

    The New York Times 2012: The Year in Graphics.
    Amazing examples of interactive storytelling and journalism, designed and developed byt the NYT Graphics team.

  2. Gorgeous typography and design for these 1932 presidential charts.

    Via papress:

    Presidential Information Wheels

    1-3. Story of Our Presidents, 1932 - This presidential portrait chart provides basic facts (including education, most notable achievement, and effect of work) for 30 American Presidents. The “underbelly” of the wheel reveals statistics carefully composed to correspond to the die-cuts on the top level. 

    4-5. “Complete a Portrait” Presidential Quiz Wheel, 1964 - This wheel uses a mix-and-match portrait system to represent key biographical data for Presidents Washington through Johnson. An odd gap on the inner disk is caused by the fact that Grover Cleveland was both the 22nd and 24th president.

    From Reinventing the Wheel by Jessica Helfand

  3. I really love the NYTimes Alexander Calder influenced infographic mapping the 512 Paths to the White House.

    I really love the NYTimes Alexander Calder influenced infographic mapping the 512 Paths to the White House.

  4. Info mashups for public knowledge
Via datahacker:

alameda county foreclosures (showing oakland, berkeley, part of hayward), 2007-2011, hexbinned. color scale goes from blue to red, and is determined by absolute number of foreclosures in that bin (max=153). figured since i’m already grouping by census blocks, i might as well use a standard unit of measure. data from OpenOakland, map tiles from Stamen. (d3/polymaps/qgis)

    Info mashups for public knowledge

    Via datahacker:

    alameda county foreclosures (showing oakland, berkeley, part of hayward), 2007-2011, hexbinned. color scale goes from blue to red, and is determined by absolute number of foreclosures in that bin (max=153). figured since i’m already grouping by census blocks, i might as well use a standard unit of measure. data from OpenOakland, map tiles from Stamen. (d3/polymaps/qgis)

  5. New York Times presidential elections infographic sets the bar once again.
Via: NYTimes

    New York Times presidential elections infographic sets the bar once again.

    Via: NYTimes

  6. 
Early stream channels of the Mississippi, geologically charted by the Army Corps of Engineers, via bldgblog

Via: urbanterior

    Early stream channels of the Mississippi, geologically charted by the Army Corps of Engineers, via bldgblog

    Via: urbanterior

    (Source: urbanterior1)

  7. lifeandcode:

    I’m really excited about D3.js, a Javascript data-visualization library used by some news organizations to turn raw data into charts, graphs, and animations.  

    Today, I got to “Hello World” in D3, using Mike Dewar’s Getting Started with D3.js.  

    In this case, D3 is taking a structured data file showing the daily cash intake at toll plazas around Manhattan and turning it into a bar chart.  

    What D3 itself actually draws is incredibly minimal — black lines on a white background; basic Times New Roman fonts.  But that’s part of the beauty — because it means all of the output can just be styled by CSS.  

    It’s also the agony, because I don’t know much CSS :)  

    I present you before-and-after debugging pictures.  In the first, messed-up one, I failed to include one line that creates a left hand margin for the bar chart’s labels to appear.  

  8. The brilliant John Nelson has mapped our every documented tropical storm since 1851 to discover that these hurricanes form the shape of a single hurricane.
Visualized by: John Nelson @ IDV
Data by: NOAA 
Via: Mark Wilson @ FastCoDesign

    The brilliant John Nelson has mapped our every documented tropical storm since 1851 to discover that these hurricanes form the shape of a single hurricane.

    Visualized by: John Nelson @ IDV

    Data by: NOAA 

    Via: Mark Wilson @ FastCoDesign

  9. jtotheizzoe:

Arctic Sea-Ice: Feeling Low. Really Low.
It’s official. Nearly a month before we see the usual “seasonal low” of Arctic sea ice as it melts throughout the summer, we have hit the record low for sea ice extent.
This means that there is now less Arctic sea ice than at any time since records began in 1978. And we still have nearly a month of additional melting to go before the autumn ice sets in.
This is due to climate change. More dark ocean water means more heat absorbed by the ocean and a chance for reinforcing these lower ice levels in seasons to come. What will this mean for ecosystems? What will this mean for those who want to exploit the uncovered mineral and shipping resources of the Arctic? What will this mean for our oceans?
This image from RealClimate shows the new low level:

(via RealClimate)

    jtotheizzoe:

    Arctic Sea-Ice: Feeling Low. Really Low.

    It’s official. Nearly a month before we see the usual “seasonal low” of Arctic sea ice as it melts throughout the summer, we have hit the record low for sea ice extent.

    This means that there is now less Arctic sea ice than at any time since records began in 1978. And we still have nearly a month of additional melting to go before the autumn ice sets in.

    This is due to climate change. More dark ocean water means more heat absorbed by the ocean and a chance for reinforcing these lower ice levels in seasons to come. What will this mean for ecosystems? What will this mean for those who want to exploit the uncovered mineral and shipping resources of the Arctic? What will this mean for our oceans?

    This image from RealClimate shows the new low level:

    (via RealClimate)

  10. In memory of Neil Armstrong, the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing Visualization, 1969 by Yanni Loukissas (2011)

    In memory of Neil Armstrong, the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing Visualization, 1969 
    by Yanni Loukissas (2011)